Week 1 Looking Back

This was a great chance to collate some photographs that I had collected in Dungeness.

I particularly liked the coral hue that came through when I printed all the pages.This idea of books and putting works together in a story has inspired me to think more about collections or series of photographs.

While photographing this collection I began to notice that all the work had some kind of connection to electrical wires.I decided to give the book a title 'Lines'.The site is home to a large nuclear power station that hums in the background.I gather from some research that the power station is due to be decomissioned.

This is my dummy book printed and sewn on the edge.I travelled to Dungeness in June to record landscapes.I called this book 'Lines'.I printed the front to show the final presentation for the dummy.Looking back on the book making exercise I found it quite beneficial to once again think about order of work and correlate image to create a story.I world definitely like to work on a real book one day.

Book rotated.jpg
DSC_4420 (2).JPG

 

Independent reflection

What your current practice is.....

My practice involves looking at the very first methods of recording images.

I am exploring the use of the cyanotype. I am at the same time interested in intensifying the colours bought by producing cyanotypes. The subject matter is always very personal.

I have been 'playing with a large family of rocks collected by myself over the last ten years. I am particularly interested in developing the work with the rocks becoming central to all the works. The symbolism behind the rock will need to be explored further. In its infancy the work responds to a feeling of belonging (when the rock are positioned together) or of abandonment or separation when the rocks are positioned far away from each other. JUXTAPOSITION!

 Stone formations often symbolize the passage from one life to the next.

I would like to think that the rocks symbolise a different phase of my life.A transition from one to another. A phase where I can think more freely about the production of photograhic art.

 

In this way the work is not a copy of something real (a recording) it is a moment during the development of the cyanotype that interests me the most. The latent stages of a photograph.Suspended by perhaps a digital photograph.

I am interested in colour and psychology. I would like to experiment with different types of prints.

Methodology is the systematic, theoretical analysis of the methods applied to a field of study. It comprises the theoretical analysis of the body of methods and principles associated with a branch of knowledge. Typically, it encompasses concepts such as paradigm, theoretical model, phases and quantitative or qualitative techniques.[1]

My methodology: I am interested in the time during the making of the works.The slow nature of sensitising paper and the frantic time while the work is developing in the sun. Is this a metaphor for something deeper, life. A love of slow life and then a quick speeding up.

I had a constructive meeting with Gary Macloed this week and fellow student Pierre Chemaly. I am interested in reading more about the why I need to photograph very simplistic shapes. Gary recommended reading about Flow by Mihaly Csiksgentmihalyi

I am waiting for a book called The Artists Reality: philosophies of ART by Mark Rothko

published in 2006...

One of the most important artists of the twentieth century, Mark Rothko (1903-1970) created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting over the course of his career. Rothko also wrote a number of essays and critical reviews during his lifetime, adding his thoughtful, intelligent, and opinionated voice to the debates of the contemporary art world. Although the artist never published a book of his varied and complex views, his heirs indicate that he occasionally spoke of the existence of such a manuscript to friends and colleagues. Stored in a New York City warehouse since the artist's death more than thirty years ago, this extraordinary manuscript, titled The Artist's Reality, is now being published for the first time. Probably written around 1940-41, this revelatory book discusses Rothko's ideas on the modern art world, art history, myth, beauty, the challenges of being an artist in society, the true nature of "American art," and much more. The Artist's Reality also includes an introduction by Christopher Rothko, the artist's son, who describes the discovery of the manuscript and the complicated and fascinating process of bringing the manuscript to publication. The introduction is illustrated with a small selection of relevant examples of the artist's own work as well as with reproductions of pages from the actual manuscript. The Artist's Reality will be a classic text for years to come, offering insight into both the work and the artistic philosophies of this great painter.

 

Ideas for this coud be:

Woodland environments photos pinned to trees.The gallery experience is one of firstly finding the gallery. This idea that we need four walls to hang work on is old fashioned.

 

I was thinking about the type of places to exhibit.

 

My double gates:

A car: moving gallery

A Farm with some large stretches of metal.

A woodland:with a set of coordinates to find the photographs.

Projection

 

Week 2 Remediation

Firstly I must look for a coherent definition to the words Immediacy and Hypermediacy.

Photographic examples of immediacy:Instagram.The representation of real life to the extreme (advertising)

Photographic examples of hypermediacy: David Hockneys polaroid works

The logic of immediacy is the idea that technology should closely reflect the real world in order to create a sense of presence (316). Or, the desire for immediacy is the desire for an experience without mediation (317, emphasis added). Immediacy, then, demands transparency—an interface that erases itself so that the user can stand “in an immediate relationship to the contents of the medium” (318). Bolter and Grusin provide a number of examples here for how transparency actually takes place—through linear perspective, the mathematization of space, the automation of the linear perspective—but I find their example of computer programming most compelling. They argue that, though humans create computer programs, these programs operate without human intervention—ensuring erasure or transparency (322). Immediacy, then, is twofold: “For if immediacy is promoted by removing the programmer/creator from the image, immediacy can also be promoted by involving the viewer more intimately in the image” (324).

Hypermediacy doesn’t seek to erase mediation; rather, it “privileges fragmentation, indeterminacy, and heterogeneity” and “emphasizes process or performance rather than the finished art object” (Mitchell qtd. in Bolter and Grusin 327). Hypermediacy is comprised of a combination of images and sounds and text and video in order to construct multiple representations within a heterogeneous space (328). The example Bolter and Grusin provide is a standard desktop interface with multiple windows open. At any given point, I have multiple Word docs, numerous Safari tabs, iTunes, and Acrobat Pro open on my computer; and I’m usually using my phone to text and check social media. This experience is constantly mediated, which reminds me—as the user—that my windowed computer is both automatic (rather than transparent) and interactive (329).

 

I once worked in a world of vast Immediacy(Fashion Photography) and now I work in the opposite world.That of showing the process first hand and recording imagery.There is no code.The code is made up by others viewing the work.Working without a point of reference is very freeing.The errors that occur are 'happy accidents' that add to the art and make the experience of viewing more fulfilling.

 

http://www.atlasgallery.com/exhibition/light-worksDuring the months and years that followed, the image evolved into a symbol of the Nicaruan revolution. 

 

To create an iconic symbol through the use of photography would be an absolute privilege. I can, however, understand the artist's frustrations. In these 'digitally regurgitated times' perhaps we as artists should be open to collaborations in order to perpetuate a cause or even our own art forms.

The photographer: created a symbol that summed up the unrest the day before Somoza fleed Nicaragua forever in July of 1979.

An excerpt from the photographer's website:

I spent six weeks there principally, because all I could feel was that I wasn’t doing anything that gave a feeling for what in fact was going on there. Not going on in the world of events, but going on in terms of how people were feeling. And that still plagues me because I am not a war photographer in the sense that I didn’t go there for that purpose. I’m really interested in how things come about and not just in the surface of what it is.

 Susan Meiselas (Links to an external site.)

Yet an iconic symbol was created. The image then went on to inspire many.

By making an image to be observed, framed and exhibited in such a way that it outlasts both the subject and the producer, we find ourselves with the ability to construct objects of worship. It could then be said that photography doesn't merely record iconicity but also generates it. REF 2

 

REF:1:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molotov_Man

REF 2:http://infocus.gettyimages.com/post/what-is-iconic-imagery#.Wx4zs0gvyUk

 

Within your own project are you explicitly referencing your inspiration and visual materials or purposely not acknowledging them?

How do you think your images will be used once you have gone and how could you control or shape that?

Photography

The Fun of it!

The magic of it!

In this week, you were asked to think about whether a photograph can be considered finished. By referencing, borrowing, appropriating, stealing, adopting, copying, paying homage or remixing, it is possible to consider that images might have a life beyond what we imagine. In this sense, all images – not just digital ones – arguably have indeterminacy, or do they?

Tasks

Think about:

  • What approaches were of most relevance to your practice.

  • Where your original contribution may be, especially if all mediation can be considered remediation.

  • How authorship might differ from intent.

  • What constructive approaches could be taken if someone remixed your work.

In your CRJ, write a short summary about:

  • What you did during the week, feedback received and how you will respond to that.

  • Any reconsiderations to the core methodology of your practice.

  • The forms your project / photographs could take moving forward.

This week I thought of Banksy The graffiti artist:

 

I had purchased some balloons for a birthday celebration in my house.The balloons were extra large and when blown up were amazing and very inspirational to my work.

I shot some photographs with them last night as a test shoot to see where I could take this inspiration.

I am also interested in the subliminal effect of work that we have seen before and therefore this is apt for week twos look at resuing imagery.

subliminal

səˈblɪmɪn(ə)l/

adjective

PSYCHOLOGY

 

  1. (of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone's mind without their being aware of it.

The balloons are quite photographic. Bright in colour I produced a series on my phone to start to understand the technical aspects. I didn't actually want the balloons in focus.I needed to blur the focus.The inter relations of the balloons was very key as I photographed them. Any hint of reality would not be acceptable for this group of photographs.

To analyse this I need to unpick this state of shooting.

1: No focus

2: No reality (fantasy)

3: Bright colours

4: Inter relations between the shapes and colours are important.

5: Shapes that are organic

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

 

Csikszentmihalyi in 2010

Born29 September 1934 (age 83)
Fiume, Kingdom of Italy (now RijekaCroatia)

Alma materUniversity of Chicago

Known forFlow (psychology)
Positive psychology
Autotelic activities

Scientific career

Doctoral studentsKeith Sawyer

The native form of this personal name is Csíkszentmihályi Mihály. This article uses Western name order when mentioning individuals.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (/ˈmiːhaɪ ˈtʃiːksɛntˈmiːhaɪ/HungarianCsíkszentmihályi Mihály, pronounced [ˈt͡ʃiːksɛntmihaːji ˈmihaːj] ( listen); born 29 September 1934) is a Hungarian-American psychologist. He recognised and named the psychological concept of flow, a highly focused mental state.[1][2][page needed] He is the Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management at Claremont Graduate University. He is the former head of the department of psychology at the University of Chicago and of the department of sociology and anthropology at Lake Forest College.[3]

 

 

Concentrating on a task is one aspect of flow.

In positive psychologyflow, also known colloquially as being in the zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does, and a resulting loss in one's sense of space and time.

“The best moments in our lives are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times… The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.”

– Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
(Here’s a fun trick to remember his name: “Me high? Cheeks send me high!”)

 

https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/mihaly-csikszentmihalyi-father-of-flow/

After a meeting with Lecturer Gary Macleod:

I questioned him on reference material that would help me understand my photography state better.By this I mean that I have identified 6 levels or elements that I require to 'make' or create a photographic image.

1:No focus ( No reference to reality)

2:A penchant for bright colours

3:A relationship between two shapes generally organic shapes

4:A love of inanimate objects

 

He first attempted to rule out the idea of taking a picture rather than making it.

My understanding of this is making a photograph is about creating ART and taking is about recording.

He recommended The edge of Vision by  Lyle Rexer and Henry Bergson 'Duration'

In his best known work, Creative Evolution (1907), Bergson made it clear that he accepted evolution as a scientifically established fact. He was born the year The Origin of Species was published and Creative Evolution adds a vital missing dimension to Darwinian theory. He believed that the failure to take into account the real time underlying the whole process results in the failure to appreciate the uniqueness of life. Bergson proposed that the evolutionary process should be seen as the expression of an enduring life force (élan vital), that is continually developing. Evolution has at its very heart this life force or vital impulse.

We then went on to discuss Flow the idea of Flow: by

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

and

A Tenth of a Second

A HISTORY

 

 

86

 

JIMENA CANALES

Publication supported by the Bevington Fund

288 pages | 33 halftones | 6 x 9 | © 2009

 

In the late fifteenth century, clocks acquired minute hands. A century later, second hands appeared. But it wasn’t until the 1850s that instruments could recognize a tenth of a second, and, once they did, the impact on modern science and society was profound. Revealing the history behind this infinitesimal interval, A Tenth of a Second sheds new light on modernity and illuminates the work of important thinkers of the last two centuries.

Tracing debates about the nature of time, causality, and free will, as well as the introduction of modern technologies—telegraphy, photography, cinematography—Jimena Canales locates the reverberations of this “perceptual moment” throughout culture. Once scientists associated the tenth of a second with the speed of thought, they developed reaction time experiments with lasting implications for experimental psychology, physiology, and optics. Astronomers and physicists struggled to control the profound consequences of results that were a tenth of a second off. And references to the interval were part of a general inquiry into time, consciousness, and sensory experience that involved rethinking the contributions of Descartes and Kant.

Considering its impact on much longer time periods and featuring appearances by Henri Bergson, Walter Benjamin, and Albert Einstein, among others, A Tenth of a Second is ultimately an important contribution to history and a novel perspective on modernity.

MAJOR INPSIRATION:olafur-eliasson

https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/

https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/artist-talk/

 

 

Bill Jay: Snipets from the essay 'So Much for Individuality'

Our cherished individuality is largely an amalgam of a myriad of forces
and influences which, only occasionally, can be sorted, seen and acknowledged.

Much more controllable, and therefore useful, is willful influence. As we are constantly
influenced by the ideas and images of others anyway, perhaps we should make greater
effort to make these influences more overt and direct. Lionel Trilling said: "The
immature artist imitates. Mature artists steal. "

This paragraph is exactly week 2!

The big ideas in my work are the exploration of Flow 'The mesmoric state' and Psychology of creating and producing imagery in an artistic context.

The work splits into two areas

The flow of time in the production phase:the paper,the exposure(the time according to the sun and its intensity),

The making of the work: the placing of the rocks(interrelations of the objects) The space between the rocks and what that represents.Psychoanalysis.The digital recording

Control: the element that which a photographic artist must have at all times in order to create at the highest level. I have recently been interested in the 'successful image' and what that needs to be created.

Gary also mentioned chemegrams....

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/camera-less-photography-techniques/http://www.atlasgallery.com/exhibition/light-works

 

 

file:///C:/Users/megan/vanda-shadowcatchers.pdf

Luis Nadeau, Encyclopedia of Printing, Photographic and Photomechanical Processes New Brunswick, NJ (Atelier Luis Nadeau), 1989, and the related website, photoconservation.com

Gordon Baldwin, Looking at Photographs: A Guide to Technical Terms Los Angeles and London (J. Paul Getty Museum in association with the British Museum Press), 1991

 

 

As we work through the week, consider how transparent you might be regarding the medium you use. Do you err towards immediacy or towards hypermediacy? How explicit are your sources within your work? Furthermore, what is your original contribution to the conversation in which your images participate?Within your own project are you explicitly referencing your inspiration and visual materials or purposely not acknowledging them?

How do you think your images will be used once you have gone and how could you control or shape that?

Photography

The Fun of it!

The magic of it!

In this week, you were asked to think about whether a photograph can be considered finished. By referencing, borrowing, appropriating, stealing, adopting, copying, paying homage or remixing, it is possible to consider that images might have a life beyond what we imagine. In this sense, all images – not just digital ones – arguably have indeterminacy, or do they?

Tasks

Think about:

  • What approaches were of most relevance to your practice.

  • Where your original contribution may be, especially if all mediation can be considered remediation.

  • How authorship might differ from intent.

  • What constructive approaches could be taken if someone remixed your work.

In your CRJ, write a short summary about:

  • What you did during the week, feedback received and how you will respond to that.

  • Any reconsiderations to the core methodology of your practice.

  • The forms your project / photographs could take moving forward.

This week I thought Banksy The artist:

 

I had purchased some balloons for a birthday celebration in my house.The balloons were extra large and when blown up were amazing and very inspirational to my work.

I shot some photographs with them last night as a test shoot to see where I could take this inspiration.

I am also interested in the subliminal effect of work that we have seen before and therefore this is apt for week twos look at resuing imagery.

subliminal

səˈblɪmɪn(ə)l/

adjective

PSYCHOLOGY

 

  1. (of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone's mind without their being aware of it.

The balloons are quite photographic. Bright in colour I produced a series on my phone to start to understand the technical aspects. I didn't actually want the balloons in focus.I needed to blur the focus.The inter relations of the balloons was very key as I photographed them. Any hint of reality would not be acceptable for this group of photographs.

To analyse this I need to unpick this state of shooting.

1: No focus

2: No reality (fantasy)

3: Bright colours

4: Inter relations between the shapes and colours are important.

5: Shapes that are organic

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

 

Csikszentmihalyi in 2010

Born29 September 1934 (age 83)
Fiume, Kingdom of Italy (now RijekaCroatia)

Alma materUniversity of Chicago

Known forFlow (psychology)
Positive psychology
Autotelic activities

Scientific career

Doctoral studentsKeith Sawyer

The native form of this personal name is Csíkszentmihályi Mihály. This article uses Western name order when mentioning individuals.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (/ˈmiːhaɪ ˈtʃiːksɛntˈmiːhaɪ/HungarianCsíkszentmihályi Mihály, pronounced [ˈt͡ʃiːksɛntmihaːji ˈmihaːj] ( listen); born 29 September 1934) is a Hungarian-American psychologist. He recognised and named the psychological concept of flow, a highly focused mental state.[1][2][page needed] He is the Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management at Claremont Graduate University. He is the former head of the department of psychology at the University of Chicago and of the department of sociology and anthropology at Lake Forest College.[3]

 

 

Concentrating on a task is one aspect of flow.

In positive psychologyflow, also known colloquially as being in the zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does, and a resulting loss in one's sense of space and time.

“The best moments in our lives are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times… The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.”

– Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
(Here’s a fun trick to remember his name: “Me high? Cheeks send me high!”)

 

https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/mihaly-csikszentmihalyi-father-of-flow/

After a meeting with Lecturer Gary Macleod:

I questioned him on reference material that would help me understand my photography state better.By this I mean that I have identified 6 levels or elements that I require to 'make' or create a photographic image.

1:No focus ( No reference to reality)

2:A penchant for bright colours

3:A relationship between two shapes generally organic shapes

4:A love of inanimate objects

 

He first attempted to rule out the idea of taking a picture rather than making it.

My understanding of this is making a photograph is about creating ART and taking is about recording.

He recommended The edge of Vision by  Lyle Rexer and Henry Bergson 'Duration'

In his best known work, Creative Evolution (1907), Bergson made it clear that he accepted evolution as a scientifically established fact. He was born the year The Origin of Species was published and Creative Evolution adds a vital missing dimension to Darwinian theory. He believed that the failure to take into account the real time underlying the whole process results in the failure to appreciate the uniqueness of life. Bergson proposed that the evolutionary process should be seen as the expression of an enduring life force (élan vital), that is continually developing. Evolution has at its very heart this life force or vital impulse.

We then went on to discuss Flow the idea of Flow: by

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

and

A Tenth of a Second

A HISTORY

 

 

86

 

JIMENA CANALES

Publication supported by the Bevington Fund

288 pages | 33 halftones | 6 x 9 | © 2009

 

In the late fifteenth century, clocks acquired minute hands. A century later, second hands appeared. But it wasn’t until the 1850s that instruments could recognize a tenth of a second, and, once they did, the impact on modern science and society was profound. Revealing the history behind this infinitesimal interval, A Tenth of a Second sheds new light on modernity and illuminates the work of important thinkers of the last two centuries.

Tracing debates about the nature of time, causality, and free will, as well as the introduction of modern technologies—telegraphy, photography, cinematography—Jimena Canales locates the reverberations of this “perceptual moment” throughout culture. Once scientists associated the tenth of a second with the speed of thought, they developed reaction time experiments with lasting implications for experimental psychology, physiology, and optics. Astronomers and physicists struggled to control the profound consequences of results that were a tenth of a second off. And references to the interval were part of a general inquiry into time, consciousness, and sensory experience that involved rethinking the contributions of Descartes and Kant.

Considering its impact on much longer time periods and featuring appearances by Henri Bergson, Walter Benjamin, and Albert Einstein, among others, A Tenth of a Second is ultimately an important contribution to history and a novel perspective on modernity.

MAJOR INPSIRATION:olafur-eliasson

https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/

 

 

Bill Jay: Snipets from the essay 'So Much for Individuality'

Our cherished individuality is largely an amalgam of a myriad of forces
and influences which, only occasionally, can be sorted, seen and acknowledged.

Much more controllable, and therefore useful, is willful influence. As we are constantly
influenced by the ideas and images of others anyway, perhaps we should make greater
effort to make these influences more overt and direct. Lionel Trilling said: "The
immature artist imitates. Mature artists steal. "

This paragraph is exactly week 2!

The big ideas in my work are the exploration of Flow 'The mesmoric state' and Psychology of creating and producing imagery in an artistic context.

The work splits into two areas

The flow of time in the production phase:the paper,the exposure(the time according to the sun and its intensity),

The making of the work: the placing of the rocks(interrelations of the objects) The space between the rocks and what that represents.Psychoanalysis.The digital recording

Control: the element that which a photographic artist must have at all times in order to create at the highest level. I have recently been interested in the 'successful image' and what that needs to be created.

Gary also mentioned chemegrams....

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/camera-less-photography-techniques/http://www.atlasgallery.com/exhibition/light-works

 

 

file:///C:/Users/megan/vanda-shadowcatchers.pdf

Luis Nadeau, Encyclopedia of Printing, Photographic and Photomechanical Processes New Brunswick, NJ (Atelier Luis Nadeau), 1989, and the related website, photoconservation.com

Gordon Baldwin, Looking at Photographs: A Guide to Technical Terms Los Angeles and London (J. Paul Getty Museum in association with the British Museum Press), 1991

9.jpg
2968.jpg

Week 4 Strategies of Freedom

Excerpt from Week 4 Notes

Flusser argued:
that it was “necessary to question photographers about freedom and to probe their practice in the pursuit of that freedom.”
In so doing, Flusser’s analysis revealed four ways in which photographers may engage with,or at least arrive at that question. These approaches all pointed to experimentation and acknowledged that the photograph is an image created and distributed automatically by programmed apparatuses in the course of a game, necessarily based on chance.

Personally I am interested in Flussers words and wisdom.

If I start to think of myself as an artist and not a photographer the idea of self expression comes into focus.

I start to think of my tools: photographic paper and lens etc as a way to express myself through these tools.To be restricted or governed  by the tools is not making art.And yes there is very much a chance element in creating photographic art. Isn't this why we are attracted to all things photographic the magic of creating an image from scratch.The magic of the chemicals at the perfect temperture,the magic of them not being at the perfect temperature and the results that bring smiles to our faces.

I am starting to build up a bank of thought about how pieces or 'bodies of work' will look like after I have worked them.

I recently traveled to a beach resort where I was really saddened by the beach erosion and the close proximity of buildings to the sea.At the same time I was also disgusted with obesity and our human condition. As a direct psychological response I was compelled to record some sand bags holding the beach from being swept away as a metaphorical look at humans and how we can get it soo wrong.

Approaching a series of images inspired by the visit.I have created some drawings that will feed back into photographs.I am starting to work in a more artistic way and not letting photography or the process overide my art work.To work on a subject in different mediums can be quite rich I am finding.

 

 

Life....

According to Mark Rothko

'Art must be in a state of flux.The tempo being slow or fast.But it must move.'

The integrity of the plastic process page 14 The Artists reality Philsophies of Art.2006 Yale

Mark Rothko

The danger again, of course, is being bewildered by many different ways of doing the same thing and the realisation that everything has been done before. The point is not to pursue the new, per se, but to think back on what we can do because, and/or in spite of this. For Flusser, the freedom in question here is not a freedom from something, but a freedom for something.

Excerpt from week 4notes

This week I have also been inspired by Richard Serra. Scuplture artist.

 

 

Inspired Richard Serra

Thinking on your practice, what are the apparatus and programmes you are using and how are you outwitting them?

 

My current practice involves cyanotypes used to record the relationship and shapes of a family of rocks. Cameraless photography fits best for me at the moment.I more interested in good shape production and light relations.I have recently visited Photo London where I was encouraged by some artists that were using cyanotypes to create their work.

 

I'm not sure what is meant by 'outwitting'.Outwitting processes that I use.The work I am producing is so simplistic in nature I wonder if this is classed as outwitting!

outwitting:

deceive by greater ingenuity.

"Ray had outwitted many an opponent"

synonyms:outsmart, out-think, outmanoeuvre, outplay, be cleverer than, steal a march on, trick, gull, make a fool of, get the better of

If outwitting means to think outside the box I think I'm still in the early stages of development with my work.To outwit an audience with a great thought behind an image perhaps.

I am not trying to outwit art viewers I am trying to use inspiration to create art that in turn may bring appreciate or joy to others.

 

In this work I was particularly interested in the vivid colours being produced while the cyanotypes was developing in the sun.The shift of tempo while creating cyanotypes is particularly interesting.I really enjoy the small steady production of paper and then the rush of excitement while watching it develop.

 

 

Do you privilege the lens, the digital sensor or the camera
manufacturers in any particular way? No I am trying to look at the past ,the very beginning of photography.I would like to experiment with gum dichromatic prints next.

To dig deeper I am also looking at the shape optimisation concept I will research this more.

And if you prefer to keep your process a black box, what would be the context and motivations for doing so and are there responsibilities
associated with that?

To smuggle human intentions into the camera’s apparatus and its programme is to alter the rules of the game, to ensure that things are not always what they seem. This might require a deviousness and/or an actual resistance to the status quo, but it can also just be the result of a curious nature. In your chosen apparatus, can anything be said to be smuggled by you or by anyone else and are you resisting something, if so, what is expected of you?

Are you resisting something?

Wow that is a powerful question.No I am not resisting but I do have a serious lack of time to process this question.

 

To be continued.

 

I am fascinated by Mark Rothko philisophies in ART.

"we thus see the artist performing a dual function:first furthering the integrity of process of self expression in the language of art and secondly protecting the organic continuity of art in relation to its own laws."

research Chemical prints

Research Gary Fabian Miller

wolgang tillmans imperfectness

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/camera-less-photography-artists/

reference flusser

http://photosynthesis-research.org/resources/Documents/Starch%20Pictures.pdf

http://www.life.illinois.edu/govindjee/Part3/35_HangarterStarchPics.pdf

Talk about Art as an investment

ana look at modern life

Emanations the book

len lye

shape optimisation claus matteok

Tasks:NOT JUST ANOTHER BUTTON PUSHER
Think about:
The relationship between you and your chosen apparatus.

I have been influenced by camera and processes in the past.My use of cyanotype has a direct link to 'probably' the over use of large expensive black boxes that tend to govern the art that I make.My conscious efforts to shun the high tech world for a more simplistic production of an art photograph comes from overuse and production of banal imagery for the fashion industry.

The fashion industry generally regenerate imagery season on season with similar brief.

At which point responsibility becomes a consideration in your approach.
Whether another photographer can do what you do, and whether you could be more original.

I am trying to think of ways to create more individual signature work. I keep thinking that I should stay away from such juvenile pressure and produce what I want to produce regardless of the impact on others.

Flusser said: the person using a camera might think that they are operating its controls to produce a picture that shows the world the way they want it to be seen, but it is the pre-programmed character of the camera that sets the parameters of this act and it is the apparatus that shapes the meaning of the resulting image.

A great example of this is the overuse of the iphone to create decent photographs that have largely been programmed to do so.There is no technical input into these photographs They are by chance and programming acceptable.
How you are not just another "button-pusher".
In your CRJ, write a short summary about:
Your experience of the week's activities and any feedback received.
Any reconsiderations to the core methodology of your project.
The forms your project / photographs could potentially take moving forward.

 

Work for using a different device;

I used my scanned at home to create these images.

I had collected these 'squirels' from Sardinia three years ago and have really wanted to make something from them. I particularly like to the focus and short depth as the squirels were 3 dimensonal. I also realised that the scanner was low on some colours. The pink hue is especially interesting to me.I love accidental Art.

 

 

 

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Holding back Megan Ringrose

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Very moved by these paintings by Richard Serra

Week 5 Three Surfaces

I am starting to think how my work should be seen in public.I have been having ideas of making posters out of the work and sticking on random places.At the moment I am still thinking about the actual materiality of the work.Will they be printed on Giclee paper or shall I use random photocopy paper?

I have contacted a printing company that works with large acetates.(A1) I have tested three different types of finishes.I am partial to one type of acetate.I like the shiney aspect of acetate.See below.I can definitely see bright primary colours working on this fantastic texture.Stil keep thinking about craig kaufmand  curled acrylic sheets for my FMP

 

 

My cyanotypes 'hose' drawings are starting to take shape.I took the originals today to a local printing shop and was woefully dissapointed in that standard that I received back.I was look at testing the idea in a type of guerilla activity to 'brighten' up Oxford.The original quality is not yet what I had hoped for.I think this is due to not using running water after washing.

  • Introduce the three activities;

  • Think about curation in photomedia;

  • Start thinking about how you will present / share your work to / with an audience;

  • Discuss initial ideas during one-to-one tutorials with tutors.

Whereas an exhibition operates in a specific space and towards an intended audience for a limited period of time, a publication offers a viewer an opportunity to live with a collection of images, to take them home and develop a relationship with them over months and years. A publication therefore offers a very different experience of your work.

For this activity, you are asked to create a 'dummy' publication that relates to your project. A dummy is a draft version of your publication in full and can help you to develop outcomes that your project and practice might embody at a later point in the course.  

Photobook or publication?

I have started to put a book together.It is based on Kelly Ellsworths drawings.

What do you want the publication to say / do? I want it to question what a photograph is.I have slightly stepped into the boundary of painting here.

How do you want it to achieve that? I have used a photographic process to create a calm meditative book.

I really enjoyed the process of creating a book.Using the format opened my mind to different uses as well.

The cyanotypes were printed on fabriano paper and sewn on one edge. I then enveloped the work in a large piece of fabriano folded twice.

I am interested in the idea of creating original works in a book like this.

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 The end

The end

Week 6 Exhibition Guidance

In my work I try to do things that have not been done before although I am increasingly being told that everything has been done before.

I wanted to achieve a gallery space in a woodland.I have had previous thoughts like a car or my double gates.I realise that the environment in which the work will hang needs to either feed into the work or be a non-distraction. I.e Why the white cube has been done so many times.

I had also thought exhibiting on a large building by projecting images from a nearby building.Other ideas have included creating posters on a billboard,slightly more anarchic with regards to permission.

 

In the 1980s in Brisbane I was involved in gallery spaces that were technically not there.They were basically squats waiting demolition.A number of galleries were born out of these spaces.Even funding was agreed for specific art projects.

 

My woodland idea is the most interestng to me.Although there are a few things that need to be thought about.Making the images impervious to rain and wind.I have been experienting with acetate images and here is what I got back from a recent collaboration with a printer in Southampton.

Thinking about the work that would be in the woodland.I do think that it might sit well in this environment.The natural space may not work well with the blue of the cyanotypes.I might park this idea for a futuree exhibition.

 

 

In this week, we will look more at how you could display your photography at the 'group' exhibition. This includes not only consideration of venues and spaces, but also ways in which the work can be installed, and how the audience can be engaged. Regardless of whether you are looking for an idea or have already got something in mind, the aim is to give some context to your chosen approach.

For this activity, find and post one example of an 'alternative space'. Try to think outside of the (traditional) white walls of a gallery, such as a supermarket (see above), a billboard, or even a shoe. Don't be afraid to post what might seem obvious, or unexpected, or even crazy, but please include an image. A brief repository of possibilities here could easily benefit all in the not-too-distant future.

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Week 8 Workshop Guidance

I am amazed to have a website up and running.It's so much easier to upload images and search for images on the internet to make easy refererence of artists work.I am feeling a little bit more professional now.

www.meganringrose.com

I have really struggled with the format of word press.

WORKSHOP

I am planning to hold a workshop for old processes of photography in my garden in the autumn.

I will open it up to students of Photography in A level.I have contacted the local college to reach out.They have not responded to my email.

 

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Week 10 Production

I've heard from Sarah Newton ,one of the designers on the Landings2018 project.She is having problems loading my image as it too small for reproduction.I do struggle with technology and I have, as a result, decided to look for a suitable digital course to strengthen my knowledge.

I have also been working hard on creating a website to house my blog and landings2018 imagery along with other new work.This has been a technical pain however I will persevere to launch the website around the same time as the landings exhibition.

 

 

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Week 12 Showtime

 

A brief description of the module and how I feel I went through the weeks.

In the first three weeks of this module I moved offices.In the next two weeks I traveled with work.

I then set up a website.A thing that I should have done right at the beginning of the course.

I feel that should have been a bit more transparent through the course however my broaband problems are so bad now that I am thinking of taking my lap top elsewhere to join!

This was an interesting module.I got to think about making and then make.I gained a lot of gallery knowledge by visting

Photo London

Photo Arles

CSM MA graduate show

Tate Modern Shape of Light

Traveled in the last two weeks of the module.

Connected with Landings2018

I am excited for my new work.I will continue to work with inanimate objects.I am really enjoying the freedom of creating very personal pieces. 

 

 

 

 

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WORKS IN PROGRESS NOTES

Works in Progess

I have spent a long time percolating ideas of Abstraction in Art and to larger extent abstraction in photography.

Coming from a commercial based photography I found myself wanting to start this new chapter of creating photographic art from a totally unique perspective.

I spent the second module experimenting with low tech ‘printing processes’ like cyanotype to create an art form that was raw and unapologetic for its crudeness. This idea stems from the commercial world demanding to see perfectness portrayed in our world in 2018.With the increasing popularity and almost breeding of a population that chase a homogenous or generic look that feeds off labels and recommendations from others on social media I find myself taking a contrarian view on society.

My low-tech approach, making photograms from rocks/inanimate objects is in direct contrast to a world of masking or ‘Photoshoping’ the real elements of life away. In my previous existence as a fashion photographer I was often asked to crop out impurities or anomies of beauty. I trained myself to edit everything out except for a ‘Sims’ like human. The subject that is ultimately left is a cut out of reality in the eyes of the advertisers.

‘Art has often been described as a form of escape from action. It has been pointed out that the artist, finding the practical affairs of the world too unpleasant withdraws from the world of true activity and ensconces himself in a world of imagination to exempt himself from this unpleasantness’

(Rothko, An Artist’s Reality, Philosophies of art 2006 P9)

I am the first to acknowledge that I live in a bubble where I question why we need to identify with another look or create images that are so similar in feel. I am interested in creating a world of imagery where I am not swayed into a particular creative process purely because I know others will enjoy it. Similarly the creation of art just to create something that hasn’t been done before feels wrong as well. When I think about abstraction in Photography I find two ideas.

1: To create images and then manipulate them after the subject matter has been shot. There are two stages of development the shooting and the manipulation.

Example Antony Cairns ‘London by Night’  photography presented on ‘ipad’ form frozen in ink.

2: A chemical interference that relies on a reaction of chemicals and in turn creates an unusual shape and colour to be organised into various art forms. This stems from a fascination of the history of photography and in essence challenges the artist to question ‘what is a photograph’

Example: Daisuke Yakota: multiple processing and experimentation are also integral to his practice. Yakota uses experimentation as a vehicle to eliminate information and narrative.

 

‘In the 21st century the art world has fully embraced the photograph as a legitimate medium equal in status to painting and sculpture.’

(Cotton, The Photograph as Contemporary Art 2009 P7)

“There are no stories in my work. There is only what the viewers find within it for themselves. I am more interested in exploring time and multiple possibilities that exist in reality.”

Daisuke Yakota:http://www.1000wordsmag.com/daisuke-yokota/

Abstraction has, in the past been born from large catastrophic happenings, globally. Anarchic Art comes from these apocalyptic happenings. The great depression in the USA was an immense catalyst for turning against the traditional view of life and looking for the new and to reinvent to see new horizons on which to build a future literally and psychologically. Abstract Art came about around 1910 more than one hundred years ago is was born out of an idea to observe the world through fresh ways of expressing ourselves through different media.

A recent exhibition and important turning point globally for abstract photography was an exhibition called The Abstract! in Finland curated by Laura Nissinen. The lecture that was made available to us in The Masters program was hugely valuable to me as an artist. Her message was loud and clear.’ Anything is possible as long as you can back it up and contextualise your work.

 'Drawing with hoses’ was directly inspired by the Siskind work on roads of the US. I wanted to make a simple cropped mark on paper. I wanted to play with shape and balance and also chance.

 

I did struggle technically with print quality. The flow of work when producing Cyanotypes can be slow and then very frenzied. I quickly got into the ‘flow’ of work and managed to produce several A1 prints.

This print has been digitally enhanced to achieve a similar result to the first image.

 

I feel that these pieces do qualify as art although they also need to be presented well. Flattened and mounted onto board. I think if I was go further in this vein of work I would try to develop a water proof way of displaying these. I recently tried to look at these works out in a guerrilla gallery not far from my where I live. I think it healthy to see the works in different spaces, especially when I was trying to propose a space that was alternative to a white box.

I love the industrial feeling of the roller door here. I was originally planning to show these works in a woodland however I think that his would have been out of context with the work.

Landings 2018 was an interesting exercise and I can’t help thinking that I need help with Photoshop and resizing my images. I’m an analogue girl.

The module was actually a bit of a wake up call in terms of production.

I went on to produce a different strand of photographs. I moved into creating some work with inanimate objects collected in Sardinia.

This work was created using a photocopier and tracing paper. I really enjoy the translucency of the material. As usual the big focus is in the shapes which are shaped by nature and therefore ‘shaped optimised’ Their roundness really appeals.

Next I created a body of work in Reading Train Station

Personally I really enjoyed working in a different way. I used an analogue lens and a digital body.

While not ground breaking I found the switch to lens based work interesting and rewarding.

I am actually waiting for some Silver Nitrate to be delivered.To create some salt prints for next week.

While reading and processing some of the reading that I have been doing I came up with

Codes of my Abstraction:

To produce one off pieces that are in essence original pieces and therefore tradable art forms.

Disregard for rules within the traditional sense of photography.

Access to brighter colours and heightened processes due to enhanced digital printing techniques.

Experimentation elemental and primary to abstraction in photography

The historical chemical history of photography is, I feel giving rise to a new group who embrace the wet processing in a nostalgic way. The chemical backbone of the photographic process is a way to give photographs identity and DNA to one-off pieces. It can also produce colours and textures that have been previously unseen.

 

In conclusion my practice 'has' moved on. I call it practice as I feel I have nothing to show the world yet. I am slowly getting to a point where I could actually show some work.

Please access PDF titled Work in Progress Module 3 to see more example of my recent work.

 

 

 

 

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 My Guerilla gallery.I love the blue hue achieved here.

My Guerilla gallery.I love the blue hue achieved here.